Divided D-76 Developer for T-Max

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sanchell
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Divided D-76 Developer for T-Max

Post by sanchell » Mon May 30, 2016 11:59 am

Over the weekend I was going through my morgue files, dating back to the early '70s. I came across this article by Neil Lipson published in Darkroom & Creative Camera Techniques. The copy had been made using a mimeograph machine and the type was beginning to fade.



It occurred to me that rather than letting these articles waste away in my file cabinet perhaps some members of the forum would find them beneficial, or perhaps simply of interest. If this is something you would like to see more of on the forum vote "yes" in the poll, below, and I will scan and post more of them.



If there is a particular topic that interests you let me know and I'll see if I have an article on the subject.

Attached files LIpson-Divided D-76-002.pdf (541.9 KB) 
Do it in the Dark,

Steve Anchell

birdreader
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Re: Divided D-76 Developer for T-Max

Post by birdreader » Thu Mar 14, 2019 12:11 pm

Photographers Formulary has a Divided D-76 formula that is different from the ones published in years past. Instead of using 2 grams Metol and 5 grams HQ, they use 4 grams Metol and 7.5 grams HQ for the Part A. You can see the formula on their site. I would suspect the changes in film emulsions over the decades necessitated some changes in formulation. I remember the earlier variants that came out decades ago.
Some "off topic" comments.
If you have Grant Haist's Modern Photographic Processing, he has in that book the MM-2 formulas for monobaths. His original MM-1 formula was in The Mondobath Manual.
The MM-2 as written simply did not work:I used arithmetic and separated out the ingredients for each film class, and tried the high speed film variant and it worked fine.
And in your book The Darkroom Cookbook you use a dichromate bleach for reversal b/w. Ilford published a Potassium Permanganate one a long time ago, it worked perfectly on some HP-5 I have.
Chromates are associated rather strongly with a acute invariably fatal leukemia. That is the reason I got rid of the Potassium Dichromate I had around for years. Kodak has not used dichromate bleaches for b/w reversal in their reversal kits for some decades. Perhaps for professional motion picture processing laboratories, they still use dichromate bleaches. And chromates going down sewers these days is not popular at all with any of the water/sewer regulator types. In fact, outright banned.
And the Potassium Permanganate can be bought at any store selling plumbing supplies, as it is used to regenerate the "green sand" filters used to remove iron from potable water. 2 pounds for about $20 at Menard's(lumber yard/etc merchant). Photographers Formulary uses a permanganate bleach with sodium bisulfAte for the sulfuric acid. I just happened to have concentrated sulfuric acid on hand I picked up some decades ago, so was able to mix the Ilford formula with it.
I also used the Etch-Bleach copper sulfate formulas as a process cameraman for many years for making line reversal positives, it worked just great. The first time the boss saw a reverse in the paper made with it he nearly fell off his chair, and it set off a war with the other newspapers(If he can do it so can you!) finding ways to make reverses.

I have been working with photographic chemistry since I was 16, starting with Dignan Photographic Newsletter many decades ago. And spent 30 years as a process cameraman working in a newspaper/job printing shop as process cameraman.
I am VERY happy to see the work you are doing with photographic processing publishing. And I will gladly send you any of the information in my files if you are interested.
Formula 51 gave me nothing but fogged film(the film may have been bad) but FX-37 was just excellent on some HP-5 I have been experimenting with.
Back in the 60sI processed some hundreds of feet of Ektachrome MS with the "Mickey Mouse TM E-4 " that was published in the Dignan Photographic Newsletter. I have some frozen Ektachrome Infrared film I am planning on using, and when that is used up, I won't need E-4 any more.
Looking at the price of the new Kodak Ektachrome, I just may not get involved with E-6. I am used to buying 100 feet of Tri-x pan for $9.95 in the 60s, has it ever gone up! LOL! We won't see those days ever again.
Let me know if you are interested in any of the collection of formulas I have, and I will gladly send them to you to use in any way you wish, the are all in the public domain as far as I know.

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sanchell
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Re: Divided D-76 Developer for T-Max

Post by sanchell » Thu Mar 14, 2019 1:28 pm

Thank you, birdreader, for the great post. A lot of invaluable information. When it comes time for another edition of the DCB we'll need to consult on things like dichromate and weeding out formulas like #51.

BTW, I began my homebrew career with Dignan's newsletter. Have a copy of 150 Do-It-Yourself Black and White Popular Photographic Formulas on my bookshelf.

There are many errors and inconsistencies in Dignan's classic book, but despite that, Mr. Dignan was the catalyst for many photographers of my generation to begin mixing their own formulas. We owe him our gratitude.
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Do it in the Dark,

Steve Anchell

birdreader
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Re: Divided D-76 Developer for T-Max

Post by birdreader » Sat Mar 16, 2019 12:05 pm

here is another monobath and speed processing soution Your site won't let me send the .pdf
Harvey Hodes came up with "Low Gamma Photographic Developer for Rapid Processing of Aerial Film" in the Versamat 5A-N processor that was also adapted to a monobath. Journal of Applied Photographic Engineering, Volume 3, Number 1, winter 1977 page49.
H-1
Phenidone------------1 gram
Hydroquinone--------2 gram
Sodium Carbonate 10 gram
Na Sulfite-------------30 grams
Water to-----------1 liter
They could get Gamma between .38 and .60 at 80 f for 30 seconds or 95F and 15 seconds in the Versamat 5A-N It massively increased the speed they could get film through the processor, by a factor over 4x.
H-2 monobath
Phenidone------------------------1 gram
hydroquinone--------------------2 gram
Na Carbonate-------------------10 gram
Sodium Sulfite------------------30 gram
Na Thiosulfate------------------50 grams
Polyethylene oxide
grade 4000---------------------4 gram
Water to-------------------------1 liter
80F 4 min or 95F 3 min
Panatomic X 90 sec to 2 min.,
I assume the Na Carbonate is monohydrate and the Thiosulfate is crystal.
Quite likely the PEO can be polyethylene Glycol 3300 used these days as a laxative.
If you can give me a e-mail addy to send .pdf s to I can send you the copy of the original.
The idea was for low gamma processing of aerial photographic film for low and medium altitude aerial photographic film.
Another one useed cystiene hydrochloride as the fixing agent instead of thiosulfate, but had much lower capacity.

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sanchell
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Re: Divided D-76 Developer for T-Max

Post by sanchell » Sat Mar 16, 2019 4:52 pm

Thank you!
Do it in the Dark,

Steve Anchell

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